Signal Corps in the Army of the Cumberland

Being an 1864 narration of the operations of the Signal Corps
focusing on the operations surrounding the battle of Stones River
also known as the Battle of
Murfreesborough
And
Through the Chickamauga Campaign



From the ANNALS of the ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND

Frontpiece


Being the introduction to the volume whereby John Fitch establishes the content of the tome.


Page 303 being our page one in which:


The compostion of the Signal Corps is revealed.
The security of the Signal Corps is demonstrated.
The Reason for the Signal Corps existence in The Army of the Cumberland.
The use of the Marine Glasses and Telescopes is shown.
The officership of the Corps is documented.
The actions prior to and during the battle of Stones River are outlined.


Page 304 being our page two in which:


The locations of the signal stations are established for the battle of Murfreesbourough.
The compostion of the Signal Telegraph AKA Flying Telegraph AKA Beardslee Telegraph wagons is made known.
The superiority of the Signal Telegraph over other telegraph systems is clearly stated.
The links from Army Headquarters are shown to reach to each Corps with the Signal Telegraph.
The number of lines used is demonstrated.
The type of insulation covering the wire is clearly established.
The length of a section of wire is stated.


Page 305 being our page three in which:


The method of paying out the wire is demonstrated.
The statement is made that the Beardslee was of great value in the Army of the Potomac.
The statement that the Beardslee was of inestimable service at Fredricksburg.
The principle use of the Beardslee with the Army of the Cumberland is noted.
The general use of the flags and torches is given without revealing any secrets.
The description of the use of the signal system from the cupola of the court-house at Murfreesborough is given.
The distance to communicate to Fort Transit given as nine and one-half miles by flag and torch.
The distance to communicate to Triune given as seventeen and one-half miles by flag and torch.
The mounting of the telescope is noted.


Page 306 being our page four in which:


The method used by the Officer in Charge to instruct the flag or torch bearer is revealed.
The use of the black with white center flag is noted.
The use of the white with red center flag is noted.
The use of the ALL RED flag for signal work is noted.
The fact that there are two stations side by side in the cupola is made known to us.
The use of a mechanical bell to call the Officer in Charge is explained.
The reason for retaining a copy of the messages is explained.
The replacement of the orderly, messenger or runner by the use of the Beardslee telegraph located at the signal station is clearly noted.
The compromise of the pre-war signal system is noted.
The existence of the rebel signal system is mentioned as being under Alexander.


Page 307 being our page five in which:


The differences between the Navy and Army systems is noted.
The astonishing speed of the Signal Corps is demonstrated with a practical example.
The promise of the Beardslee AKA "field telegraph" to make the speed even better is mentioned.
The need for constant practice is made note of.
The confining nature of signal duties is explained.
The boredom of signal duties is explained.
The distance of twenty-seven miles between Triune and Pilot Knob is covered by flag and torch in clear weather.
The distance of twenty-five miles between Pilot Knob and Lavergne is coverd by flag and torch in clear weather.
The distance of forty-five miles between Pilot Knob and Nashville is less reliably covered by flag and torch in clear weather.
The use of the Signal Officers as scouts is explained.


Page 308 being or page six and our last page in which:


The direction of the Signal Corps of the Army of the Cumberland under Captain Jesse Merrill is noted.
The Murfreesborough station is noted to be under the command of Captain C.R. Case and T.J. Kelly.
The Telegraphic Train is noted to be under the command of lieutenant D. Wonderly and assisted by Lieutenants S.F. Reber and D.F. Davis.
The fact that the Corps in the Department constists of about forty officers and about one-hundred and forty enlisted men.
The high value of the Signal Corps is noted.